Ecologist Paul Ehrlich, June 14

PHILADELPHIA, June 1, 2012

What:

Stanford University ecologist and population expert Paul Ehrlich will discuss the environmental and social impacts related to the strain on Earth’s carrying capacity in a public talk, “Can We Get Needed Population Shrinkage In Time?” Ehrlich will suggest how issues ranging from climate disruption and toxification of the planet to increasing odds of vast epidemics and nuclear resource wars can impact this strain. He will present potential solutions, such as controlling population growth through women’s empowerment, rethinking economic ideals, and creating a “bottom-up” movement that unites academic thinkers with civil society. He also will suggest ways that the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University can contribute even more to this important issue.

When:            

Thursday, June 14, 6:30 p.m. Networking reception from 6-6:30 p.m.

Register:       

Admission: $15, $10 for Academy members. To register: ansp.org/new-questions.

Who:              

Ehrlich is Bing professor of population studies and president of the Center for Conservation Biology in the Department of Biology at Stanford University. He is active in the Millennium Alliance for Humanity and the Biosphere. He wrote or co-wrote more than 40 books and 1,000 scientific papers and articles in the popular press. He has appeared on many TV and radio programs.

Where:          

The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, 19103

Background:  

The talk is part of the Academy’s Bicentennial Series, New Questions for an Old Planet. For more information, visit http://www.ansp.org/get-involved/cep/ or call 215-299-1080.

News Media Contact

Carolyn Belardo

Senior Communications Manager

belardo@ansp.org
Phone: 215-299-1043

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